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Holy Trinity C of E Primary School

To be the best we can be – for God, for others and for ourselves

Our Curriculum

Introduction

The curriculum is all the planned activities that we organise in order to promote learning and personal growth and development.  At Holy Trinity it includes not only the formal requirements of the National Curriculum, but also the range of extra- curricular activities that the school organises in order to enrich the experience of the child. It also includes the ‘hidden curriculum’, or what the children learn from the way they are treated and expected to behave.

Each half term, staff plan a cross-curricula topic web which includes a range of experiences and a clear outcome for the teaching and learning that term.  These are published on our school website.  They include a range of agreed non-negotiables, such as a first-hand    experience, links to our school values, Literacy and Numeracy objectives.

We aim to teach children how to grow into positive, responsible people, who can work and co-operate with others while developing knowledge and skills so that they can achieve their best in life.  Since joining the Academy Trust, Holy Trinity have been working with other schools on developing their pupils’ ‘Growth Mindset’ and resilience. We are also working together on improving children’s achievement in reading across the Trust.

 

Values

Our school curriculum is underpinned by the Christian values we hold dear at our school: hope, love, trust, forgiveness, justice, peace and reverence for all living things. These are always a focus in Collective Worship themes.  Each class focuses on a particular value and they lead a Family Collective Worship based on their value.

The curriculum is the means by which the school achieves its objective of educating children in the knowledge, skills and understanding that they need in order to lead fulfilling lives. Our curriculum is split into the subject areas given to us by the Statutory Foundation Stage Curriculum for children in Reception Class moving onto the National Curriculum for children in Years 1 to 6.  To ensure our curriculum is relevant and meaningful for our children, we link areas of learning as much as we can and use the local community as much as possible to bring learning to life.  We value the way in which all children are unique and our curriculum promotes respect for the views of each individual child, as well as for people of all cultures.  We value the spiritual and moral development of each person, as well as their intellectual and physical growth.

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English

English leader: Mrs J Morrell

 

Vision and Aims

  • English has a vital place in education and in society. A high-quality education in English teaches pupils to speak and write fluently so that they are able to communicate their ideas and emotions to others and through their reading and listening, others can communicate with them. 

  • Through reading in particular, pupils are able to develop culturally, emotionally, intellectually, socially and spiritually. Literature, especially, plays a key role in such development. Reading also enables pupils both to acquire knowledge and to build on what they already know. 

  • At Holy Trinity, all pupils are encouraged to read widely in order to widen their vocabulary and broaden their experiences, introducing them to the best that has been thought and said so that they appreciate human creativity and achievement.  

  • All the skills of language are essential to participating fully as a member of society; pupils, therefore, who do not learn to speak, read and write fluently and confidently are effectively placed at a disadvantage.

  • The aim for English in the national curriculum is to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment. 

  • The national curriculum for English aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • can read easily, fluently and with good understanding

  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and  information

  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language

  • implement targeted interventions to ensure that pupils who are not fluent readers and communicators by the end of Key Stage One are fully prepared to access reading opportunities across the balanced curriculum in Key Stage Two. 

  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage

  • write clearly and accurately, adapting their language and style for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences

  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas

  • are competent in speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate.

 

Lessons

Children from Year 1 to Year 6 are taught daily. Lessons last about one hour in the Infants and one hour in the Juniors. 

 

Supporting English At Home

Here are 5 simple ways you can support the teaching of English at home.

  • Encourage your child to talk to you about their day at school, things that are happening in the news or things that they are interested in.  Retell well-known stories to your child and encourage your child to retell a story to you or a younger brother or sister.

  • Encourage your child to share a wide variety of books with you at home. Read to your child often so that they can hear a fluent reader modelling the use of expression when reading aloud.  Listen to your child read regularly and talk to them about what they have read. 

  • Join the local library.

  • Encourage your child to write – it might be a shopping list, keep a diary or write a letter to a family member or friend.

  • Explore new words together. Model how to use a dictionary to find the meaning of new words. Challenge your child to use these words when talking or writing.

 

Maths
Maths Leader: Miss H Daniels


Vision and Aims
At Holy Trinity Primary School, our vision and aims in Maths are:

  • To implement the current legal requirements of the Foundation Stage (FS) and the National

Curriculum (NC)

  • To become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics so that they develop conceptual

understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately

  • Solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of problems with increasing

sophistication, including in unfamiliar contexts and to model real-life scenarios

  • Reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry and develop and present a

justification, argument or proof using mathematical language

  • Foster positive attitudes, fascination and excitement of the discovery through the teaching

and learning of mathematical concepts

  • Broaden their knowledge and understanding of how mathematics is used in the wider world
  • Use and understand mathematical language and recognise its importance as a language for

communication and thinking
At Holy Trinity we want all children to see mathematics as an interconnected subject and be able to
make connections across mathematical ideas to develop fluency, mathematical reasoning and
competence in solving increasingly sophisticated problems. We want our children to apply their
mathematical knowledge across our curriculum.
The expectation is that the majority of pupils will move through the programmes of study at broadly
the same pace. However, decisions about when to progress should always be based on the security
of pupils’ understanding and their readiness to progress to the next stage. Pupils who grasp concepts
rapidly should be challenged through being offered rich and sophisticated problems before any
acceleration through new content. Those who are not sufficiently fluent with earlier material should
consolidate their understanding, including, through additional practice, before moving on.
Lessons
Children from Reception to Year 6 are taught daily. Lessons last about one hour in the Infants and
one hour in the Juniors.
Supporting Maths at Home
Here are 5 simple ways you can support the teaching of Maths at home:

  • Work on helping your child recognise number bonds
  • Work on rapid recall for times tables and simple addition and subtraction facts
  •  Read our school’s calculation policy so you can find out how our school teaches particular

mathematical strategies

  • Talk about and discuss Maths with your child at home
  • See Maths in everyday life

 

Science

Science leader: Mr Shacklady

 

Vision and Aims

Our vision for Science at Holy Trinity is for all children to develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. To develop understanding of nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them. Plus, to equip the children with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future. In Science we aim to develop the children’s knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts, processes and skills which relate to our everyday experiences. A balance of Biology, Physics and Chemistry based learning is spread throughout KS1 and KS2 to ensure children are in receipt of a broad and balanced Science curriculum. The learning is strongly sequenced with key vocabulary that is built upon each year to further develop and support the progress of children. For example; in Plants, Year 1 look at the identifying common plants, Year 2 identify parts of the plant and a simple life cycle of a plant. Year 3 look at seed dispersal and germination and finally in Year 5, we look at pollination. All these sequences can be found on our Science Curriculum Map on the School’s website. Often Science is taught through enquiry-based lessons which are practical and also a lot of fun! Developing children’s enquiry skills is extremely important so learning can be led by children’s curiosity and questions. We encourage children to think creatively about Science investigations, observations, recordings and findings are presented by children in a variety of ways during lessons.  

Lessons

Children from Year 1 to Year 6 are taught Science once a week. Lessons last at least one hour in the Infants and at least one hour in the Juniors. 

 

Supporting Science at Home

Here are 5 simple ways you can support the teaching of Science at home.

 

  • Talk about questions about the world the children might have such as; why don’t objects float in the air. Encourage their scientific curiosity.   
  • Look at important scientific discoveries and how they have impacted the world and how we understand it. 
  • Watch major scientific events that might occur throughout their lives.
  • Explore the local area and environment and seeing how things change throughout the year.  
  • Talk about the differences between the three sciences; Physics, Biology and Chemistry and why each one is important. 

 

 

History

(History) leader: Debbie Babcock

 

Vision and Aims

  • To know and understand the history of Great Britain as a coherent, chronological

narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: Understand how people’s

lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced

by the wider world.

  • To know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world such

as: ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic

features of past non-European societies and achievements and follies of mankind.

  • To gain an understanding of abstract historical terms such as ‘empire’,

‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry.’

  • To understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and

consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make

connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions

and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and

analyses.

  • To understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used

rigorously to make historical claims, and know how and why contrasting

arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed.

  • To gain an historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different

contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and

international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and

social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.

 

Lessons

Children from Year 1 to Year 6 are taught History once a week during a half term.

Lessons last about 1 hour in the Infants and 1-2 hours in the Juniors.

 

Supporting History At Home

Here are 5 simple ways you can support the teaching of History at home.

  •  Talk to your child about the history topic they have been learning about in school.
  •  Share your knowledge of the subject.
  •  Visit the library and find interesting books about the subject.
  •  Research the topic on the internet:- BBC History for Kids, National Geographic Kids,
  •  Visit places that have a connection with the topic.

 

 

Geography

(Geography) leader: Debbie Babcock

 

Vision and Aims

  • To develop knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both land

and sea – including their physical and human characteristics and how these

provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes.

  • To understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human

geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they

bring about spatial variation and change over time.

  • To acquire geographical skills needed to: collect, analyse and communicate with

a range of data, gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their

understanding of geographical processes.

  • Interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps,

diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems

(GIS)

  • Communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through

maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.

 

Lessons

Children from Year 1 to Year 6 are taught Geography once a week during a half term.

Lessons last about 1 hour in the Infants and 1-2 hours in the Juniors.

 

Supporting Geography At Home

Here are 5 simple ways you can support the teaching of Geography at home.

  • Talk to your child about the Geography topic they have been learning about in

school.

  •  Share your knowledge of the subject.
  •  Visit the library and find interesting books about the subject.
  •  Research the topic on the internet:- National Geographic Kids

 Visit places that have a connection with the topic.

 

RE

RE leader: Mrs J Morrell


 

Vision and Aims

 

Religious education contributes to children and young people’s education in schools by asking challenging questions about meaning and purpose in life, beliefs about God, ultimate reality, issues of right and wrong and what it means to be human. In RE they learn about and from religions and worldviews in local, national and global contexts, to discover, explore and consider different answers to these questions. They learn to weigh up the value of wisdom from different sources, to develop and express their insights in response, and to agree or disagree respectfully. Teaching therefore should equip pupils with knowledge and understanding of a range of religions and worldviews, enabling them to develop their ideas, values and identities. It should develop in pupils’ skills in speaking and listening so that they can participate positively in our society with its diverse religions and worldviews. Pupils should gain and deploy the skills needed to understand, interpret and evaluate texts, sources of wisdom and authority and other evidence. They learn to articulate clearly their personal beliefs, ideas, values and experiences while respecting the right of others to differ. 

 

The curriculum for R.E. aims to ensure that all pupils at Holy Trinity:

  • reflect theologically and explore the ultimate questions and challenges of life in today’s society;

  • reflect critically on the truth claims of Christian belief;

  • see how the truth of Christianity is relevant today;

  • understand the challenge faced by Christians in today’s society;

  • develop the skills to handle the Bible text;

  • recognise that faith is based on commitment to a particular way of understanding God and the world;

  • begin to develop their own commitments, beliefs and values;

  • develop a sense of themselves as significant, unique and precious;

  • experience the breadth and variety of the Christian community;

  • engage in thoughtful dialogue with other faiths and traditions;

  • become active citizens, serving their neighbour;

  • find a reason for hope in a troubled world;

  • understand how religious faith can sustain believers in difficult circumstances and in the face of opposition.

 

R.E at Holy Trinity also helps pupils to:

  • learn about other faiths, their beliefs, traditions and practices and from them through experiences and dialogue;

  • recognise and respect those of all faiths in their search for God;

  • recognise areas of common belief and practice between different faiths;

  • enrich and expand their understanding of truth while remaining faithful to their own tradition;

  • enrich their own faith through examples of holy living in other traditions.

 

As a Church School, the R.E. curriculum at Holy Trinity includes:

  • opportunities to explore the experience of the Church’s year;

  • study of the story of the local Christian community with its saints and martyrs;

  • visits to places of worship, especially the local parish Church and a Cathedral, to develop the understanding of the Church as a living community;

  • welcoming visitors from the local parish to share their experience of Christian belief and life;

  • work with the local parish to enable these visits and links to occur;

  • skills to confidently use religious language to express knowledge and opinions;

  • a well-used set of Bibles in language that can be understood by the learners and examples of Bibles and prayer books from a variety of contexts;

  • the facility to listen to Christian ‘psalms, hymns and spiritual songs’ from a wide variety of traditions;

  • access to Christian artefacts that are used with care, respect and confidence;

  • a sacred space that can be used as a focus for prayer and silent reflection;

 

R.E. in Holy Trinity enables:

  • pupils and teachers to talk openly and freely about their own personal beliefs and practice without fear of ridicule;

  • pupils to make excellent and appropriate progress in their knowledge and understanding of Christianity;

  • pupils from Christian families to talk openly about their beliefs and values in lessons and to grow in their faith;

  • pupils from other faith backgrounds to understand and be encouraged in their faith;

  • pupils with no religious background to be given an insight into what it means to be a person of faith;

  • pupils of all backgrounds to have a safe place to explore the ultimate questions and challenges of life in today’s society.


 

Lessons

Children from Year 1 to Year 6 are taught once a week. Lessons last about 45 minutes in the Infants and one hour and thirty minutes in the Juniors. 

 

Supporting RE At Home

Here are 5 simple ways you can support the teaching of RE at home.

  • Talk about recent events in the news and encourage your child to think about and reflect on them ‘through God’s eyes’. 

  • Read and talk about stories from an age appropriate Bible or other scared text together with your child. 

  • Investigate other faiths – use festivals and celebrations as way to begin to learn about another faith. 

  • Visit local places of worship. 

  • Encourage your child to think of others.  This might be as simple as doing something kind for others or it could be by supporting a local charity.

 

Information/Communication Technology

Computing leader: Mrs Hill

 

Vision

A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Pupils are also equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

 

Aims

The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils: 

 

  • Can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation 

 

  • Can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems

 

  • Can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems  

 

  • Are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

 

Lessons

Children from Year 1 to Year 6 are taught computing most weeks. Lessons last about 45 minutes in the Infants and 1 hour in the Juniors. 

 

Supporting Computing At Home

Here are 5 simple ways you can support the teaching of computing at home.

 

  • Practise typing skills on Purplemash using ‘2Type’ game
  • Play coding games on Purplemash
  • Explain to your child the importance of staying safe online
  • Talk about what your child has learnt in computing lessons at school
  • If your child asks you a question, use a search engine and find out the answer together

 

 

Physical Education
Physical Education leader: Mrs Hitchen / Mr Shacklady

 

Vision and Aims

The Physical Education curriculum is carefully and coherently sequenced to enable our children

to develop a growing knowledge of the themes outlined above. Pupils’ knowledge builds

towards clearly defined end points so everyone knows what we expect our pupils to achieve by

the end of each topic, each year and each key stage. To meet the educational needs of our

school community we have selected the following core knowledge concepts as a focus for our

teaching. These are explored in increasing depth as pupils move through the school.

In KS1 pupils should develop fundamental movement skills, become increasingly competent

and confident and access a broad range of opportunities to extend their agility, balance and

coordination, individually and with others. They should be able to engage in competitive (both

against self and against others) and co-operative physical activities, in a range of increasingly

challenging situations. Pupils should be taught to:

  • master basic movements including running, jumping, throwing and catching, as well as developing balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities
  • participate in team games, developing simple tactics for attacking and defending
  • perform dances using simple movement patterns

In KS2 pupils should continue to apply and develop a broader range of skills, learning how to

use them in different ways and to link them to make actions and sequences of movement. They

should enjoy communicating, collaborating and competing with each other. They should develop

an understanding of how to improve in different physical activities and sports and learn how to

evaluate and recognise their own success. Pupils should be taught to:

  • use running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and in combination
  • play competitive games, modified where appropriate [for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis], and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending
  • develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance [for example, through athletics and gymnastics
  • perform dances using a range of movement patterns
  • take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team
  • compare their performances with previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best

In Reception class Physical Education is taught as a discrete subject along with the Moving and

Handling area of learning within the Early Years Foundation Stage curriculum. Further details of

how the Early Years curriculum is organised can be found on our Early Years policy.

In Years 1 to 6 Physical Education is taught as a discrete subject, though meaningful links are

made with other subjects in our curriculum, each knowledge organiser shows where there are

 

links to the English and Maths curriculum. The topics we teach are outlined in the curriculum

map for Physical Education. This is published on our website.

To support high quality knowledge rich lessons, the school subscribes to The PE Hub. All

teaching materials are adapted to meet the requirements of our Christian vision and curriculum

intent.

 

Lessons

Physical Education is allocated the 2 hours per year group on our weekly timetables.

Timetables are published on our website every half term.

Supporting Physical Education At Home

Here are 5 simple ways you can support the teaching of Physical Education at

home.

  • Familiarise yourself with the Change 4 Life ‘Activities’ and encourage up to 10 minutes physical activity per day at home
  • Encourage your child to participate in a sport or physical activity of their choosing for up to 60 minutes once per week
  • Teach your child to ride a bike
  • Take your child swimming and support them in learning to swim
  • Take a long walk and enjoy the outdoor environment

 

PSHE

PSHE Lead: Miss Lorna Bond

Vision

At Holy Trinity CE Primary School we aim to provide a PSHE curriculum to support the needs of our children.  Through the PSHE curriculum we aim to equip pupils with the knowledge and skills they will need for life now and in the future.  This knowledge and these skills will help them to understand and relate to others and give them the knowledge to support them in making safe informed decisions in an ever changing world.

Aims

The aims are for children to explore the following overarching concepts developed through our programmes of study.

  1. Identity – their personal qualities, attitudes, skills, attributes and achievements and what influences these; understanding and maintaining boundaries around their personal privacy, including online.
  2. Relationships – including different types and in different settings, including online.
  3. A Healthy and Balanced Lifestyle – physically, socially and emotionally.  Including within relationships, work-life, exercise and rest, spending and saving and lifestyle choices.
  4. Risk and Safety – identification, assessment and how to manage risk and including behaviour and strategies to employ in different setting, including online in an increasingly connected world.
  5. Diversity and Equality – in all its forms, with due regard to the protected characteristics set out in the Equality Act 2010.
  6. Rights, Responsibilities and Consent – including the notion of universal human rights, fairness and justice and in different contexts.
  7. Change and Resilience – as something to be managed, the skills, strategies and ‘inner resources’ we can draw on when faced with challenging change or circumstance.
  8. Power – how it is used and encountered in a variety of contexts including online; how it manifests through behaviours including bullying, persuasion, coercion and how it can be challenged or managed through negotiation and ‘win-win’ outcomes.
  9. Career – including enterprise, employability and economic understanding.

 

Lessons

In Reception; Personal, Social and Emotional Development, is a prime area of the curriculum and is taught supported in everything they do from continuous provision and direct teaching activities.  Children from Year 1 to Year 6 are taught PSHE lessons either weekly for one half term or fortnightly over a whole term.  In Year 1 and Year 2 the lesson lasts 20 – 30 mins.  In year 3 and Year 4 the lessons last 30-40 mins and in Year 5 and Year 6 the lessons last 45 mins.

Resources

To achieve this we use the guidance from the PSHE association which is an integrated scheme of learning with personal, social and health education, as well as relationships and sex education.  The curriculum is taught in three core themes across Y1 to Y6 which include:

Health and Wellbeing

Relationships

Living in the Wider World (economic wellbeing and being responsible citizens)

NB Information for Personal, Social and Emotional Development in the EYFS see EYFS curriculum leaflet

 

Music

Music leader: Mrs Hill

 

Vision

A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Pupils are also equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

 

Aims

The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils: 

 

  • Can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation 

 

  • Can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems

 

  • Can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems  

 

  • Are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

 

Lessons

Children from Year 1 to Year 6 are taught computing most weeks. Lessons last about 45 minutes in the Infants and 1 hour in the Juniors. 

 

Supporting Computing At Home

Here are 5 simple ways you can support the teaching of computing at home.

 

  • Practise typing skills on Purplemash using ‘2Type’ game
  • Play coding games on Purplemash
  • Explain to your child the importance of staying safe online
  • Talk about what your child has learnt in computing lessons at school
  • If your child asks you a question, use a search engine and find out the answer together 

 

 

Design and Technology

Design and Technology leader: Mr Shacklady 

 

Vision and Aims

Our vision for Design Technology at Holy Trinity is for all children to develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world. To build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users. To critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others. To understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook. Design and Technology lessons at Holy Trinity are mostly practical with making and producing a product but the children will also learn about the importance of evaluating existing products, designing their own products, evaluating their products effectively and the health and safety aspects of the task they are undertaking. All are essential skills that can be transferred into their daily lives inside and outside of school. Overall, the children undertake a variety of projects across the school including, making healthy sandwiches, baking bread, making moving toys and creating a car alarm.


Lessons

Children from Year 1 to Year 6 are taught three Design & Technology units a school year with each unit lasting a half term. With D & T being a largely practical subject lesson length can vary depending on the phase the children are in when developing a product. 

 

Supporting Design and Technology at Home

Here are 5 simple ways you can support the teaching of Design and Technology at home.

  • Talk about how different products are made and produced for example; the toys they play with. 
  • Explore how to design something that could improve their lives and make a task easier. 
  • Look at influential designs and designers who have had an impact on the world for example; Isambard Brunel.
  • Explore how to cook and bake different dishes from different cultures and try different cuisines. 
  • Talk about where their favourite foods and how they are produced.

 

Art
Art Leader: Miss H Daniels
Vision and Aims
Art and design education should engage, inspire and challenge pupils, equipping, them with the
knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As
pupils progress, they should be able to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of
art and design. They should also know how art and design both reflect and shape our history and
contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation
At Holy Trinity Primary School, our vision and aims in Art are:

  • To produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences
  • To become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • To evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design
  • To know about great artists, craft makers and designers and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms

By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills
and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.
Lessons
Year 1 to Year 6 children are taught three Art topics per year. There are six lessons per topic and
they are usually completed within a half term. Lessons last about one hour in the Infants and one
hour in the Juniors.
Supporting Art at Home
Here are 5 simple ways you can support the teaching of Art at home:

  • Talk about creativity
  • Explore drawing and painting opportunities
  • Find out about great artists, for example Claude Monet, Picassco, Andy Warhol, Wassily

Kandinsky and look at the work they have produced

  • Visit Art Galleries, for example The Atkinson and The Walker Art Gallery,
  • When looking at artwork and artefacts, ask your child questions, for example ‘Why do you

think it’s this colour?’ or ‘What do you like best about this picture?’

 

Sex and Relationship Education

The Governors of Holy Trinity consider that Sex and Relationship Education is an important part of the Primary School curriculum and consequently have accepted a policy for Sex and Relationship Education throughout the school.  This policy considers the importance of personal, loving, family relationships.  It is developed from the Reception classes, where they may look at families, to lower Juniors where they may look at the human body and visible gender differences.  In Year 5 the issue of puberty and menstruation is considered.  In Year 6 reproduction and teenage years are at the centre.  Sex and Relationship Education is taught with sensitivity and understanding, using methods and themes appropriate for the child’s age.  Junior parents are informed by letter, together with a lesson summary, before the lessons take place in order that parents can inform the teacher should they wish to withdraw their child. A full copy of the policy, which is reviewed regularly, is available to parents for viewing at the school with prior notification.

                                                                                                                                   

Special Educational Needs and Disabilities

At Holy Trinity all our children are equally valued, regardless of whether they have special educational needs. We have high, yet realistic, expectations of all the children and aim to achieve these through the removal of barriers to learning and participation. We will ensure that all our children are valued within our school community through appropriate curriculum provision. We respect the fact that our children:

  • have different educational and behavioural needs and aspirations
  • need different strategies for learning
  • acquire, assimilate and communicate information at different rates
  • need a range of different teaching strategies to meet these needs.

 

Our aims are:

  • To create an environment that supports children with special educational needs.
  • To ensure that the special educational needs of children are identified, assessed and provided for.
  • To make clear the expectations of all partners in the process.
  • To identify the roles and responsibilities of staff in providing for children’s special educational needs.
  • To enable all children to have complete access to the full curriculum and every aspect of school life.
  • To ensure that parents/carers play a full part in supporting their child’s education.
  • To ensure our children have a voice in the process.
  • To work in partnership with parents and children to regularly review and evaluate progress.

 

Children who have been identified as having special educational needs are supported in the classroom or may work outside the classroom with the class teaching assistant, the learning mentor or the specialist SEND teaching assistant. The aim of this work is to provide children with short targeted programmes of support to enhance their learning in the classroom.

The school SEND Offer and SEND Policy are available for further information.

 

Healthy Lifestyles – healthy eating

At Holy Trinity we aim to provide children and families with a knowledge and understanding of how to adopt a healthy lifestyle. We offer a range of clubs to support this, including family cooking and sports clubs for both families and pupils.  Curriculum activities allow children to develop their understanding of what it takes to plan and prepare a healthy meal/lunchbox, for example. Infant children are provided with fresh fruit daily and stickers may be awarded at lunchtime to children who eat well.  Children in KS2 are invited to participate in a variety of sports. Our gardening club grow herbs/ fruit and vegetables which are then used to prepare food in our children’s specially developed kitchen area.

 

We take every opportunity to invite other groups and agencies into school which can contribute to our children’s health and well-being.

 

We believe that is important that pupils have a voice in their education and have opportunities to become active and positive citizens who make real decisions about local issues. Our School Council, which is elected every year, is very proactive in seeking the views of their peers and making decisions that affect life at school. They are instrumental in developing our whole school anti-bullying strategy, linking with other schools on a community gardening project and working with Sefton Council on a scheme to improve Kings Gardens on Southport Promenade.

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